September 2011 Archives

In September we celebrated Lois Pierson-Houck as she completed 20 years in the saddle at Sylvan Dale. Lois has been a steady and resolute champion providing a sense of security to the entire Sylvan Dale family.

lois_party_group

Starting her Sylvan Dale career in the spring of 1991, Lois has seen many changes on the Ranch including the building of the Heritage not to mention several shifts in personnel and ranch structure. Lois’ current position is in group sales. Her welcoming voice on the end of the line exudes a sense of confidence that only a well-seasoned professional can provide.

We have every reason to think that Lois could launch a new career as a consultant in “How to Adapt to Change and Come Out On Top.” Thank goodness she chooses to ride the range with us!

Congratulations, Lois, with our sincere “Thanks!”

Sylvan Dale Guest Ranch is excited to be attending both Bixpo and the Governor’s Tourism Conference this month. Please visit our booth to say hello and introduce yourself if you’ll be attending either of these local events.

Bixpo: Thursday, September 15th 7a – 7p

Bixpo 2011
http://www.ncbr.com/ncbr_events.asp?nID=28

 

CGTC: Wednesday, September 21st – Fri, September 23rd

2011 Governor's Tourism Conference Loveland
http://www.coloradotourismconference.com/

Filed under Group Events by on #

Visitors attuned to the natural world (as most Sylvan Dale guests are) often comment on the diversity of the Ranch—wildflowers, butterflies, birds, and mammals. Sylvan Dale lies at a sort of “crossroads,” between the mountains and the plains and also between north and south. And in recent decades there have been subtle changes.

Fifty years ago, there was one jay here, Stellar’s jay, a bird typical of ponderosa pine woodlands. Then folks increasingly noticed blue jays—birds of the eastern deciduous forests—in the riparian corridor of the Big Thompson and in ornamental plantings. Soon thereafter, hybrids between Steller’s and blue jays began to appear along the foothills of the Front Range, first in Boulder and now more widely, including Sylvan Dale.

pinyon_jay.jpg Then this week, Susan saw a pinyon jay in the yard. Native to the pinyon-juniper woodland of southwestern US and México, these birds occur mostly from the southwestern half of Colorado, in pinyon-juniper woodlands. Sylvan Dale has the junipers, but not the pinyon. Nonetheless, this season at least the Ranch apparently is attractive to these birds. Perhaps it’s because the junipers (“cedars”) are particularly beautiful this year, with a huge “cone” crop. Whatever the jays’ inspiration, bienvenida, amigos!

- David Armstrong
Sylvan Dale Resident Naturalist

Mammals of Colorado, 2nd edition is now available:
Check your hometown bookstore or use the link above